Saturday, June 22, 2013

STAINED GLASS WATER BOTTLE


It's that time of year: rapid-fire-gift-time. Within a one month period, there's Father's day, graduation season, two family member's and a close friend's birthday. This would be just fine if I were rollin' in the dough <audible sigh> Alas, I am just about the farthest thing from dough rollin'. I just finished grad school and got a super education, a rather fancy looking piece of paper, and a long-term budget. Solution? Put my design and fabrication training to use and produce some pretty presents to please the people (alliteration makes everything sound excellent).
























STEP ONE: GATHER THE GOODS



WHAT YOU'LL NEED:

A mason jar of your choosing (I chose a wide mouthed variety for easy cleaning)
A reusable straw (totally optional, but hey, let's save the planet!)
1/4" rubber grommet (make sure that you get a grommet the same size as your straw)
Pebeo black glass outliner (any brand or any color is fine but look for dishwasher safe)
Pebeo black glass paint (these are to create the stained glass effect)
A pencil
Xacto knife
Paint brush
A metal ruler or straight edge
A soft tape measurer
A drill and 3/8" bit
A piece of paper to draw your design on
A bit of tape (not necessary, but helpful ... more on that later)

STEP TWO: MEASURE THE JAR



So this is the only time you'll need the soft tape measure. If you don't have one, fear not! You can just use a piece of paper. Use a strip of paper just like I'm using the tape in the pictures. Mark with a pencil the dimensions, unroll the paper, then use a straight ruler to measure to the mark you made. Boom! Problem solved.

STEP THREE: CUT PAPER TO SIZE

Mark out the length and width that you measured. If you don't have an Xacto, just use scissors. I like the Xacto because it's more precise. 

STEP FOUR: DRAW YOUR DESIGN 

I'm a big fan a geometry, so my design is a square grid bisected on the diagonal to create a series of triangles. When I go to fill in the stained glass part, I'll create a larger mosaic design within the system that I set up for myself here. You, however, can draw whatever you like! Just make sure it is something you can outline, and then fill with color.


STEP FIVE: ADJUST YOUR PAPER TEMPLATE


Roll the paper and put it in the jar. I used a tab of tape to make a cylinder out of the paper; makes it much easier to keep it straight when it's in the jar.

Now, you might have this problem: The jar is tapered and then paper template won't go down to the bottom. Just cut a series of slits the same height as the taper in the bottom of your paper. Keep the slits on a regular interval!

I got lucky and had a design that makes it easy to know where to put the slits, but a good rule of thumb is to make them the same distance apart as they are tall.

After making the slits in the paper, the design should fit much better!

STEP SIX: TRACE YOUR DESIGN WITH OUTLINER


A steady hand goes a long way, but don't worry if it's a bit shaky. There's something nice about seeing the hand of the designer in the final product. Plus, when you have a hundred lines, the only thing you notice is the overall affect, not the minute wiggles and jiggles you may have left behind.

You can see the wiggles, but not bad, right?

STEP SEVEN: FILL IN WITH DESIRED DESIGN

Take a small paint brush and fill in the cells with the glass paint you bought. I stuck with black as I'm a sucker a simple palette. Depending on how stained-glassy you like yours will dictate the number of layers you need. I went for a solid black so I did about 4 coats.

STEP EIGHT: BAKE TO SET

One important thing to mention: make sure you let everything sit for at least 24 hours before you bake to set. If you bake right away, it will wipe right off. After that, bake for 40 minutes at 345 degrees (double check the instructions on your outliner to see what they recommend).

STEP NINE: MAKE HOLE FOR STRAW


Use a 3/8" bit (or whatever the outside diameter of your rubber grommet is) and carefully drill a hole through the lid of the jar. I would recommend drilling the hole while the lid is screwed on jar. Make sure you brace it and clean it thoroughly before you drink from it!

After you drill the hole, there will be some jagged sharp bits. Use some needle nose pliers to clean up the sharp edges. The goal is allow the grommet to lie flat on the lid.

Add the rubber grommet by pinching it and carefully inserting it into the hole you just made.

STEP TEN: ... NOTHING. THAT'S IT. YOU'RE DONE!



Now you can enjoy your pretty new water bottle. Or, like me, give it away as a gift, miss it, and decide to make one for yourself (hell, you have all the materials already!). Enjoy!

1 comment:

  1. Please continue this great work and I look forward to more of your awesome blog posts.
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